Photo by Aaron Kittredge from Pexels

This blog was originally posted on Medium on January 1, 2019. It was periodically updated as things changed. The blog will be updated until such a time as it becomes clear who became the nominee for each Party.

President Donald Trump

  • President Donald Trump (Republican) filed to run for re-election in 2020 on, January 20, 2017 — according to Ballotpedia.

UPDATE: The Guardian reported that President Donald Trump formally launched his 2020 campaign in Orlando, Florida, on June 19, 2019.

UPDATE: Reuters reported, on August 18, 2019, that President Donald Trump said he would keep Vice President Mike Pence as his running mate when he seeks re-election in November 2020.

Representative John Delaney

  • Representative John Delaney (Democrat) announced on July 29, 2017, that he was running for president in 2020. He announced this in a piece he wrote for The Washington Post titled: “John Delaney: Why I’m running for president”.

UPDATE: John Delaney did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: John Delaney did qualifiy for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: John Delaney did not qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). He did not meet the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019. John Delaney also failed to meet the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: John Delaney did not qualify for the fourth Democratic debate. Ballotpedia reported that John Delaney did not meet did not meet the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls, donations from at least 130,000 unique donors, and a minimum of 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

UPDATE: John Delaney did not qualify for the fifth Democratic debate. To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors.

UPDATE: John Delaney did not qualify for the sixth Democratic debate (December 19, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to reach 4% in four early-state or national polls or 6% in two early-state polls from Oct. 16 through Dec. 12, in addition to getting 200,000 unique donors, with 800 of those from 20 different states.

UPDATE: John Delaney did not qualify for the seventh Democratic debate (January 20, 2020). To qualify, candidates needed to hit at least 5% support in at least four DNC-approved national polls, or at least 7% in two DNC-approved polls from the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina. They also had to demonstrate that they had at least 225,000 unique donors and at least 1,000 donors in a minimum of 20 states.

UPDATE: On January 31, 2020, John Delaney tweeted: “It has been a privilege to campaign for the Democratic nomination for President, but it is clear that God has a different purpose for me at this moment in time. Read my full statement here:”

The tweet, which was the start of a thread, linked to a page on the Delaney for President 2020 website. Part of it includes a summary, which is followed by John Delaney’s statement. The summary part says:

Today, 2020 Presidential candidate John Delaney announces his decision to withdraw from the 2020 race. This decision is informed by internal analyses indicating John’s support is not sufficient to meet the 15% viability in a material number of caucus precincts, but sufficient enough to cause other moderate candidates to not make the viability threshold, especially in rural areas where John has campaigned harder than anyone. He strongly believes the Democratic Party should advance candidates with progressive values on the big issues of our time, but who are committed to governing with pragmatic, fact-based, bipartisan solutions. This approach – which is what successfully won back the House in 2018 – beats Trump, unifies our nation and gets things done. We have many candidates in the 2020 race, running in Iowa and otherwise, who meet these criteria. John does not want the good work of his campaign to make it harder for those like-minded candidates on the bubble of viability in many Iowa precincts to advance in the Iowa caucuses and garner delegates…


Entrepreneur and Founder of Venture4America Andrew Yang

  • Entrepreneur and Founder of Venture4America Andrew Yang (Democrat) announced on YouTube on February 8, 2018, that he will run for president. He wants Universal Basic Income and Universal Health Care.

UPDATE: Andrew Yang did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Andrew Yang did qualifiy for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: Andrew Yang did qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). He met the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019 and the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: Andrew Yang did qualify for the fourth Democratic debate (October 15, 2019). He met the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls, donations from at least 130,000 unique donors, and a minimum of 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

UPDATE: Andrew Yang did qualify for the fifth Democratic debate (November 20, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors.

UPDATE: Andrew Yang did qualify for the sixth Democratic debate (December 19, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to reach 4% in four early-state or national polls or 6% in two early-state polls from Oct. 16 through Dec. 12, in addition to getting 200,000 unique donors, with 800 of those from 20 different states.

UPDATE: Andrew Yang did not qualify for the seventh Democratic debate (January 14, 2020). To qualify, candidates needed to hit at least 5% support in at least four DNC-approved national polls, or at least 7% in two DNC-approved polls from the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina. They also had to demonstrate that they had at least 225,000 unique donors and at least 1,000 donors in a minimum of 20 states. Andrew Yang met the qualification of having at least 225,000 unique donors, but did not met the other criteria.

UPDATE: Andrew Yang did qualify for the eighth Democratic debate (February 7, 2020). To qualify, candidates must have 5% support in four national or state polls out of New Hampshire, South Carolina, or Nevada, or 7% polling in two state polls from the list of qualified polls. Candidates must also demonstrate they have recieved contributions from 225,000 unique donors, including 1,000 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, U.S. territories, or the District of Columbia.

UPDATE: NBC News reported on February 11, 2020, (the night of the New Hampshire Primary), that Andrew Yang was dropping out of the presidential race. From NBC News:

…Initially seen as a long-shot candidate, Yang used a savvy social media strategy to garner legions of devoted followers who referred to themselves as the “Yang Gang”.

Addressing supporters in New Hampshire on Tuesday night, Yang said: “While there is great work left to be done, you know I am the math guy, and it is clear tonight from the numbers that we are not going to win this race. I am not someone who wants to accept donations and support in a race that we will not win. And so tonight I am announcing I am suspending my campaign for president….

ABC News posted a tweet: “Andrew Yang: “Though thousands of voters came out for our campaign tonight, tonight is not the outcome we fought so hard to achieve. It is bitterly disappointing for many of us but it shouldn’t be.” The tweet included a video of Andrew Yang speaking, with several of his supporters standing behind him and holding Andrew Yang signs.

Andrew Yang posted a tweet: “I am so proud of this campaign. Thank you to everyone who got us here.”

Andrew Yang posted (and pinned) a tweet of a photo of himself wearing his American flag scarf – and not wearing a tie – holding a microphone. The text next to the photo said: “I stand before you today and say that while we did not win this election, we are just getting started. This is the beginning.” It also included his signature.


Former Virginia State Senator Richard Ojeda

  • Former Virginia State Senator Richard Ojeda (Democrat) announced on November 12, 2018, on Facebook, that he was running for president.

UPDATE: The Intercept posted an article on January 25, 2019, titled: “Richard Ojeda Drops Out Of Presidential Race”. From the article:

State Sen. Richard Ojeda ended his long-shot presidential bid on Friday. A leader of the state’s teachers strikes last year, Ojeda concluded that the campaign ultimately wasn’t winnable and told his supporters that he could no longer ask people to contribute money to a cause he thought was lost.


Senator Elizabeth Warren

  • Senator Elizabeth Warren (Democrat) announced on December 31, 2018, she was launching an exploratory committee for president in a YouTube video.

UPDATE: On April 9, 2019, Elizabeth Warren posted a tweet with a video that clarified that she was running for president. It included scenes of her traveling around the country and speaking to people.

UPDATE: Elizabeth Warren did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Elizabeth Warren did qualifiy for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: Elizabeth Warren did qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). She met the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019 and the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: Elizabeth Warren did qualify for the fourth Democratic debate (October 15, 2019). She met the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls, donations from at least 130,000 unique donors, and a minimum of 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

UPDATE: Elizabeth Warren did qualify for the fifth Democratic debate (November 20, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors.

UPDATE: Elizabeth Warren did qualify for the sixth Democratic debate (December 19, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to reach 4% in four early-state or national polls or 6% in two early-state polls from Oct. 16 through Dec. 12, in addition to getting 200,000 unique donors, with 800 of those from 20 different states.

UPDATE: Elizabeth Warren did qualify for the seventh Democratic debate (January 14, 2020). To qualify, candidates needed to hit at least 5% support in at least four DNC-approved national polls, or at least 7% in two DNC-approved polls from the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina. They also had to demonstrate that they had at least 225,000 unique donors and at least 1,000 donors in a minimum of 20 states.

UPDATE: Elizabeth Warren did qualify for the eighth Democratic debate (February 7, 2020). To qualify, candidates must have 5% support in four national or state polls out of New Hampshire, South Carolina, or Nevada, or 7% polling in two state polls from the list of qualified polls. Candidates must also demonstrate they have received contributions from 225,000 unique donors, including 1,000 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, U.S. territories, or the District of Columbia.

UPDATE: On January 21, 2020, the Democratic National Committee changed the criteria for the ninth Democratic Debate (February 19, 2020). To qualify for the debate, candidates must recieve 10% of more in at least four polls between January 15, 2020, and February 18, 2020, which include national polls or Nevada and South Carolina polls, or hit at least 12% in two polls in Nevada and South Carolina. Candidates can also qualify for the debate if they get one delegate in either Iowa or New Hampshire. There will be no donor requirements. Elizabeth Warren did qualify for the ninth Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Elizabeth Warren did qualify for the tenth Democratic debate (South Carolina, February 25, 2020).

On February 15, 2020, the Democratic National Committee changed the criteria for the tenth Democratic debate. To qualify, a candidate must either have been allocated at least one pledged delegate from either Iowa, New Hampshire, or Nevada.

OR the candidate must meet the polling threshold of 10% or more support in at least four polls, each of which must be sponsored by different Qualifying Poll Sponsors or by the same Qualifying Poll Sponsor in different geographic areas. They must also receive 12% or more support in two single-state polls in South Carolina that are sponsored by 13 specific Qualifying Poll Sponsors.


Representative Tulsi Gabbard

  • Representative Tulsi Gabbard (Democrat) announced on January 12, 2019, on CNN’s “The Van Jones Show” that she would make a formal announcement that she was running for president within the next week.

UPDATE: The Hill posted an article on January 25, 2019, titled “Tulsi Gabbard to hold campaign launch rally Feb. 2.” The article says Tulsi Gabbard will hold a rally in Oahu, Hawaii, on February 2, 2019, where she will formally launch her presidential run.

UPDATE: Tulsi Gabbard officially announced that she was running for president at The ALOHA Launch in Hawaii on February 2, 2019. It was live-streamed on YouTube. That video is available to view.

UPDATE: Tulsi Gabbard did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Tulsi Gabbard did not qualifiy for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).UPDATE: Tulsi Gabbard did not qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). She met the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019, but failed to meet the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: Tulsi Gabbard did qualify for the fourth Democratic debate (October 15, 2019). She met the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls, donations from at least 130,000 unique donors, and a minimum of 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

UPDATE: Tulsi Gabbard did qualify for the fifth Democratic debate (November 20, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors.

UPDATE: Tulsi Gabbard did not qualify for the sixth Democratic debate. To qualify, candidates had to reach 4% in four early-state or national polls or 6% in two early-state polls from Oct. 16 through Dec. 12, in addition to getting 200,000 unique donors, with 800 of those from 20 different states. According to NPR, Tulsi Gabbard was one poll short of making the stage, but had already announced that even if she reached the threshold, she’d rather campaign in early states instead.

UPDATE: Tulsi Gabbard did not qualify for the seventh Democratic debate. To qualify, candidates needed to hit at least 5% support in at least four DNC-approved national polls, or at least 7% in two DNC-approved polls from the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina. They also had to demonstrate that they had at least 225,000 unique donors and at least 1,000 donors in a minimum of 20 states.

UPDATE: Tulsi Gabbard did not qualify for the eighth Democratic debate (February 7, 2020). To qualify, candidates must have 5% support in four national or state polls out of New Hampshire, South Carolina, or Nevada, or 7% polling in two state polls from the list of qualified polls. Candidates must also demonstrate they have received contributions from 225,000 unique donors, including 1,000 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, U.S. territories, or the District of Columbia.

UPDATE: Tulsi Gabbard did not qualify for the ninth Democratic debate. On January 21, 2020, the Democratic National Committee changed the criteria for the ninth Democratic Debate (February 19, 2020). To qualify for the debate, candidates must recieve 10% of more in at least four polls between January 15, 2020, and February 18, 2020, which include national polls or Nevada and South Carolina polls, or hit at least 12% in two polls in Nevada and South Carolina. Candidates can also qualify for the debate if they get one delegate in either Iowa or New Hampshire. There will be no donor requirements.

UPDATE: Tulsi Gabbard did not qualify for the tenth Democratic debate (February 25, 2020). She got zero out of the four poll threshold, and zero out of the 2 delegate threshold.

On February 15, 2020, the Democratic National Committee changed the criteria for the tenth Democratic debate. To qualify, a candidate must either have been allocated at least one pledged delegate from either Iowa, New Hampshire, or Nevada.

OR the candidate must meet the polling threshold of 10% or more support in at least four polls, each of which must be sponsored by different Qualifying Poll Sponsors or by the same Qualifying Poll Sponsor in different geographic areas. They must also receive 12% or more support in two single-state polls in South Carolina that are sponsored by 13 specific Qualifying Poll Sponsors.


Former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development for Barack Obama Julián Castro

  • Former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development for Barack Obama Julián Castro (Democrat) announced on January 12, 2019, on the Texas Democrats website his candidacy for president.

UPDATE: Julián Castro did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Julián Castro did qualifiy for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: Julián Castro did qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). He met the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019 and the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: Julián Castro did qualify for the fourth Democratic debate (October 15, 2019). He met the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls, donations from at least 130,000 unique donors, and a minimum of 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

UPDATE: Julián Castro did not qualify for the fifth Democratic debate (November 20, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors. Castro’s campaign said he cleared the donor threshold, but in the more than 30 polls released in the qualifying period, Castro did not hit 3 percent once.

UPDATE: Julián Castro did not qualify for the sixth Democratic debate (December 19, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors.

UPDATE: On January 2, 2020, Julián Castro tweeted: “It’s with profound gratitude to all of our supporters that I suspend my campaign for president today. I’m so proud of everything we’ve accomplished together. I’m going to keep fighting for an America where everyone counts – I hope you’ll join me in that fight.” The tweet included a video that is passionate and moving. Towards the end of the video, he announced that he was suspending his presidential campaign.


Senator Kirsten Gillibrand

  • Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (Democrat) announced on January 15, 2019,on “The Late Show” that she was forming an exploratory committee to run for president.

UPDATE: The Guardian reported, on March 17, 2019, that Kristen Gillibrand formally launched her presidential bid. Kristen Gillibrand tweeted: “I’m running for president. Let’s prove that brave wins. Join me:” It includes a link to her official website and a video. That tweet is followed by another, in which Kristen Gillibrand announced she will hold a speech in front of Trump International in New York City on March 24, 2019.

UPDATE: Kirsten Gillibrand did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Kirsten Gillibrand did qualifiy for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: NBC News reported on August 28, 2019, that Kirsten Gillibrand has dropped her bid for the Democratic nomination in 2020. Kirsten Gillibrand announced this news in a tweet that began with: “Today, I am ending my campaign for president”. The tweet included a video.


Senator Kamala Harris

  • Senator Kamala Harris (Democrat) announced on January 21, 2019, she was running for president on “Good Morning America” and in a tweet.

UPDATE: Kamala Harris did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Kamala Harris did qualifiy for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: Kamala Harris did qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). She met the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019 and the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: Kamala Harris did qualify for the fourth Democratic debate (October 15, 2019). She met the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls, donations from at least 130,000 unique donors, and a minimum of 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

UPDATE: Kamala Harris did qualify for the fifth Democratic debate (November 20, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors.

UPDATE: On December 2, 2019, Kamala Harris announced on Twitter that she was suspending her campaign. Her tweet said: “To my supporters, it is with deep regret – but also with deep gratitude – that I am suspending my campaign today. But I want to be clear with you: I will keep fighting every day for what this campaign has been about. Justice for the People. All the people.” The tweet included a link to a Medium post in which Kamala Harris states: “My campaign for president simply doesn’t have the financial resources we need to continue.”

UPDATE: Kamala Harris did qualify for the sixth Democratic debate, but had dropped out of the race before the debate would happen. To qualify for the debate, candidates had to reach 4% in four early-state or national polls or 6% in two early-state polls from Oct. 16 through Dec. 12, in addition to getting 200,000 unique donors, with 800 of those from 20 different states.


Mayor of South Bend, Indiana, Pete Buttigieg

  • Mayor of South Bend, Indiana, Pete Buttigieg (Democrat) announced in a tweet on January 23, 2019, that he launched a presidential exploratory committee. If elected, he would be the first gay president of the United States of America.

UPDATE: On April 14, 2019, Pete Buttigieg officially announced that he was running for president. He made the announcement in South Bend, Indiana.

UPDATE: Pete Buttigieg did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Pete Buttigieg did qualify for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: Pete Buttigieg did qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). He met the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019 and the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: Pete Buttigieg did qualify for the fourth Democratic debate (October 15, 2019). He met the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls, donations from at least 130,000 unique donors, and a minimum of 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

UPDATE: Pete Buttigeig did qualify for the fifth Democratic debate (November 20, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors.

UPDATE: Pete Buttigeig did qualify for the sixth Democratic debate (December 19, 2019). To qualify for the debate, candidates had to reach 4% in four early-state or national polls or 6% in two early-state polls from Oct. 16 through Dec. 12, in addition to getting 200,000 unique donors, with 800 of those from 20 different states.

UPDATE: Pete Buttigeig did qualify for the seventh Democratic debate (January 14, 2020). To qualify, candidates needed to hit at least 5% support in at least four DNC-approved national polls, or at least 7% in two DNC-approved polls from the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina. They also had to demonstrate that they had at least 225,000 unique donors and at least 1,000 donors in a minimum of 20 states.

UPDATE: Pete Buttigeig did qualify for the eight Democratic debate (February 7, 2020). To qualify, candidates must have 5% support in four national or state polls out of New Hampshire, South Carolina, or Nevada, or 7% polling in two state polls from the list of qualified polls. Candidates must also demonstrate they have received contributions from 225,000 unique donors, including 1,000 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, U.S. territories, or the District of Columbia.

UPDATE: On January 21, 2020, the Democratic National Committee changed the criteria for the ninth Democratic Debate (February 19, 2020). To qualify for the debate, candidates must recieve 10% of more in at least four polls between January 15, 2020, and February 18, 2020, which include national polls or Nevada and South Carolina polls, or hit at least 12% in two polls in Nevada and South Carolina. Candidates can also qualify for the debate if they get one delegate in either Iowa or New Hampshire. There will be no donor requirements. Pete Buttigeig did qualify for the ninth Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Pete Buttigeig did qualify for the tenth Democratic debate (South Carolina, February 25, 2020).

On February 15, 2020, the Democratic National Committee changed the criteria for the tenth Democratic debate. To qualify, a candidate must either have been allocated at least one pledged delegate from either Iowa, New Hampshire, or Nevada.

OR the candidate must meet the polling threshold of 10% or more support in at least four polls, each of which must be sponsored by different Qualifying Poll Sponsors or by the same Qualifying Poll Sponsor in different geographic areas. They must also receive 12% or more support in two single-state polls in South Carolina that are sponsored by 13 specific Qualifying Poll Sponsors.


Author, lecturer, and activist Marianne Williamson

  • Author, lecturer, and activist Marianne Williamson (Democrat) announced on January 28, 2019, at the Saban Theatre in Los Angeles, that she was running for president. The announcement was recorded and can be viewed in a YouTube video.

UPDATE: Marianne Williamson did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Marianne Williamson did qualify for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: Marianne Williamson did not qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). She met the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019, but failed to meet the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: Marianne Williamson did not qualify for the fourth Democratic debate. Ballotpedia reported she did meet the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, but did not meet the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls.

UPDATE: Marianne Williamson did not qualify for the fifth Democratic debate. To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors. On November 6, 2019, she posted a tweet that began with: “We’re a cool million dollars away from my voice being heard in the final stretch of the campaign…”

UPDATE: Marianne Williamson did not qualify for the sixth Democratic debate (December 19, 2019). To qualify for the debate, candidates had to reach 4% in four early-state or national polls or 6% in two early-state polls from Oct. 16 through Dec. 12, in addition to getting 200,000 unique donors, with 800 of those from 20 different states.

UPDATE: WMUR9 reported on January 2, 2020, that Marianne Williamson had laid off her entire campaign staff in New Hampshire and nationally. This comes from “sources”, who told WMUR9 that Marianne Williamson employed about 45 staffers in the four early voting states as well as her central campaign headquarters.

One of the staffers in New Hampshire was former U.S. Representative Paul Hodes, who was a senior campaign adviser and New Hampshire state director. He confirmed to WMUR9 that their story was accurate. He is no longer with the campaign, and neither is national campaign manager Patricia Ewing. Hodes confirmed that Marianne Williamson is still running for President.

UPDATE: Marianne Williamson did not qualify for the seventh Democratic debate (January 14, 2020). To qualify, candidates needed to hit at least 5% support in at least four DNC-approved national polls, or at least 7% in two DNC-approved polls from the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina. They also had to demonstrate that they had at least 225,000 unique donors and at least 1,000 donors in a minimum of 20 states.

UPDATE: Marianne Williamson suspended her presidential campaign on January 10, 2020, in a post on her official presidential campaign website. It started with:

Dear Friend,

I ran for president to help forge another direction for our country. I wanted to discuss things I felt needed to be discussed that otherwise were not. I feel that we have done that.

I stayed in the race to take advantage of every possible effort to share our message. With caucuses and primaries now about to begin, however, we will not be able to garner enough voted in the election to elevate our conversation any more than it is now. The primaries might be tightly contested among the top contenders, and I don’t want to get in the way of a progressive candidate winning any of them.

As of today, therefore, I’m suspending my campaign…


Senator Cory Booker

  • Senator Cory Booker (Democrat) announced on February 1, 2019, that he was running for president. The announcement was made in a tweet that included a short video.

UPDATE: Cory Booker did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Cory Booker did qualify for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019)

UPDATE: Cory Booker did qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). He met the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019 and the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: Cory Booker did qualify for the fourth Democratic debate (October 15, 2019). He met the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls, donations from at least 130,000 unique donors, and a minimum of 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

UPDATE: Cory Booker did qualify for the fifth Democratic debate (November 20, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors.

UPDATE: Cory Booker did not qualify for the sixth Democratic debate (December 19, 2019). To qualify for the debate, candidates had to reach 4% in four early-state or national polls or 6% in two early-state polls from Oct. 16 through Dec. 12, in addition to getting 200,000 unique donors, with 800 of those from 20 different states.

UPDATE: Cory Booker did not qualify for the seventh Democratic debate (January 14, 2020). To qualify, candidates needed to hit at least 5% support in at least four DNC-approved national polls, or at least 7% in two DNC-approved polls from the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina. They also had to demonstrate that they had at least 225,000 unique donors and at least 1,000 donors in a minimum of 20 states. He met the qualification of having at least 225,000 unique donors, but did not meet the other qualifications.

UPDATE: Cory Booker announced in a tweet, on January 13, 2020, that he was suspending his campaign for president. The tweet said: “It’s with a full heart that I share this news – I’m suspending my campaign for president. To my team, supporters, and everyone who gave me a shot – thank you. I am so proud of what we built, and I feel nothing but faith in what we can accomplish.” The tweet included a video.


Senator Amy Klobuchar

  • Senator Amy Klobuchar (Democrat) announced on February 10, 2019, in an event in Minneapolis, that she was running for president. She posted a tweet with the announcement. The tweet included a photo with her standing on snow filled stage behind a podium.

UPDATE: Amy Klobuchar did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Amy Klobuchar did qualify for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: Amy Klobuchar did qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). She met the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019 and the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: Amy Klobuchar did qualify for the fourth Democratic debate (October 15, 2019). She met the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls, donations from at least 130,000 unique donors, and a minimum of 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

UPDATE: Amy Klobuchar did qualify for the fifth Democratic debate (November 20, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors.

UPDATE: Amy Klobuchar did qualify for the sixth Democratic debate (December 19, 2019). To qualify for the debate, candidates had to reach 4% in four early-state or national polls or 6% in two early-state polls from Oct. 16 through Dec. 12, in addition to getting 200,000 unique donors, with 800 of those from 20 different states.

UPDATE: Amy Klobuchar did qualify for the seventh Democratic debate (January 14, 2020). To qualify, candidates needed to hit at least 5% support in at least four DNC-approved national polls, or at least 7% in two DNC-approved polls from the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina. They also had to demonstrate that they had at least 225,000 unique donors and at least 1,000 donors in a minimum of 20 states.

UPDATE: Amy Klobuchar did qualify for the eight Democratic debate (February 7, 2020). To qualify, candidates must have 5% support in four national or state polls out of New Hampshire, South Carolina, or Nevada, or 7% polling in two state polls from the list of qualified polls. Candidates must also demonstrate they have recieved contributions from 225,000 unique donors, including 1,000 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, U.S. territories, or the District of Columbia.

UPDATE: On January 21, 2020, the Democratic National Committee changed the criteria for the ninth Democratic Debate (February 19, 2020). To qualify for the debate, candidates must recieve 10% of more in at least four polls between January 15, 2020, and February 18, 2020, which include national polls or Nevada and South Carolina polls, or hit at least 12% in two polls in Nevada and South Carolina. Candidates can also qualify for the debate if they get one delegate in either Iowa or New Hampshire. There will be no donor requirements. Amy Klobuchar did qualify for the ninth Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Amy Klobuchar did qualify for the tenth Democratic Debate (South Carolina, February 25, 2020).

On February 15, 2020, the Democratic National Committee changed the criteria for the tenth Democratic debate. To qualify, a candidate must either have been allocated at least one pledged delegate from either Iowa, New Hampshire, or Nevada.

OR the candidate must meet the polling threshold of 10% or more support in at least four polls, each of which must be sponsored by different Qualifying Poll Sponsors or by the same Qualifying Poll Sponsor in different geographic areas. They must also receive 12% or more support in two single-state polls in South Carolina that are sponsored by 13 specific Qualifying Poll Sponsors.


Former Massachusetts Governor Bill Weld

  • Former Massachusetts Governor Bill Weld (Republican) announced on February 15, 2019, at an event at Politics & Eggs in Bedford, the launch of an exploratory committee to challenge President Donald Trump for the Republican nomination in 2020. He also tweeted his announcement.

Senator Bernie Sanders

  • Senator Bernie Sanders (Independent — but running as a Democrat) announced on February 19, 2019, that he is running for president. He tweeted: “I’m running for president. I am asking you to join me today as part of an unprecedented and historic grassroots campaign that will begin with at least 1 million people from across the country. Say you’re in:” The tweet included a video.

UPDATE: Bernie Sanders did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Bernie Sanders did qualifiy for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: Bernie Sanders did qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). He met the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019 and the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: Bernie Sanders did qualify for the fourth Democratic debate (October 15, 2019). He met the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls, donations from at least 130,000 unique donors, and a minimum of 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

UPDATE: Bernie Sanders did qualify for the fifth Democratic debate (November 20, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors.

UPDATE: Bernie Sanders did qualify for the sixth Democratic debate (December 19, 2019). To qualify for the debate, candidates had to reach 4% in four early-state or national polls or 6% in two early-state polls from Oct. 16 through Dec. 12, in addition to getting 200,000 unique donors, with 800 of those from 20 different states.

UPDATE: Bernie Sanders did qualify for the seventh Democratic debate. (January 14, 2020). To qualify, candidates needed to hit at least 5% support in at least four DNC-approved national polls, or at least 7% in two DNC-approved polls from the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina. They also had to demonstrate that they had at least 225,000 unique donors and at least 1,000 donors in a minimum of 20 states.

UPDATE: Bernie Sanders did qualify for the eighth Democratic debate (February 7, 2020). To qualify, candidates must have 5% support in four national or state polls out of New Hampshire, South Carolina, or Nevada, or 7% polling in two state polls from the list of qualified polls. Candidates must also demonstrate they have received contributions from 225,000 unique donors, including 1,000 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, U.S. territories, or the District of Columbia.

UPDATE: On January 21, 2020, the Democratic National Committee changed the criteria for the ninth Democratic Debate (February 19, 2020). To qualify for the debate, candidates must recieve 10% of more in at least four polls between January 15, 2020, and February 18, 2020, which include national polls or Nevada and South Carolina polls, or hit at least 12% in two polls in Nevada and South Carolina. Candidates can also qualify for the debate if they get one delegate in either Iowa or New Hampshire. There will be no donor requirements. Bernie Sanders did qualify for the ninth Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Bernie Sanders did qualify for the tenth Democratic debate (South Carolina, February 25, 2020).

On February 15, 2020, the Democratic National Committee changed the criteria for the tenth Democratic debate. To qualify, a candidate must either have been allocated at least one pledged delegate from either Iowa, New Hampshire, or Nevada.

OR the candidate must meet the polling threshold of 10% or more support in at least four polls, each of which must be sponsored by different Qualifying Poll Sponsors or by the same Qualifying Poll Sponsor in different geographic areas. They must also receive 12% or more support in two single-state polls in South Carolina that are sponsored by 13 specific Qualifying Poll Sponsors.


Washington Governor Jay Inslee

  • Washington Governor Jay Inslee (Democrat) announced on March 1, 2019, that he was running for president. He tweeted: “VIDEO: This is our moment, our climate, our mission — together, we can defeat climate change. That’s why I’m running for president. Join #OurClimateMoment today.” The tweet included a video.

UPDATE: Jay Inslee did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Jay Inslee did qualify for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: USA Today reported, on August 21, 2019, that Jay Inslee announced he will seek a third term as governor of the state of Washington just a day after leaving the Democratic primary race for president.


Former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper

  • Former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper (Democrat) announced on March 4, 2019, in a tweet that included a video that he was running for president. He then went on Good Morning America where he said he can beat Donald Trump, and that he can bring people together.

UPDATE: John Hickenlooper did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: John Hickenlooper has qualified for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: Reuters reported on August 15, 2019, that “former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper dropped his bid for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination on Thursday after his centrist campaign failed to catch fire amid two dozen hopefuls seeking to challenge Republican Donald Trump.” Reuters states that John Hickenlooper might instead run for a U.S. Senate seat in Colorado.


Former Representative of Texas’s 16th Congressional District Beto O’Rourke

  • Former Representative of Texas’s 16th Congressional District Beto O’Rourke (Democrat) texted KTSM in El Paso, Texas, “I’m really proud of what El Paso did and what El Paso represents. It’s a big part of why I’m running. This city is the best example of this country at its best.” on March 13, 2019. On March 14, 2019, Beto O’Rourke tweeted: “I am running to serve you as the next president. The challenges we face are the greatest in living memory. No one person can meet them on their own. Only this country can do that, and only if we build a movement that includes all of us. Say you’re in: BetoORourke.com”. The tweet included a video.

UPDATE: Beto O’Rourke did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Beto O’Rourke did qualify for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: Beto O’Rourke did qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). He met the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019 and the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: Beto O’Rourke did qualify for the fourth Democratic debate (October 15, 2019). He met the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls, donations from at least 130,000 unique donors, and a minimum of 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

UPDATE: On November 1, 2019, Beto O’Rourke tweeted a thread that started with: “Our campaign has always been about seeing clearly, speaking honestly, and acting decisively. In that spirit: I am announcing that my service to the country will not be as a candidate or as the nominee.” It links to a Medium post written by Beto O’Rourke.


Former U.S. Senator from Alaska Mike Gravel

  • Former U.S. Senator from Alaska Mike Gravel (Democrat) announced on April 2, 2019, that he was running for president. On April 18, 2019, he posted a tweet that said: “Here’s the official Mike Gravel 2020 Campaign Launch Ad — “Rock 2.0” Join the #Gravlanche to push American politics to the left and speak truth to power, send Mike $1 to get him on the debate stage.” The tweet included a video.

UPDATE: Mike Gravel did not qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: On July 31, 2019, Mike Gravel tweeted: “The DNC kept us off the stage tonight even though we qualified, but the #Gravelanche is not over. We’re gonna keep going. As the campaign ends, we’re going to help build institutions on the left which can grow power, shape policy, and create strong activists for the long haul.”

UPDATE: On August 6, 2019, Mike Gravel tweeted: “I am proud and honored to endorse Senator Bernie Sanders for the presidency of the United States.” The tweet included a video.


Representative Tim Ryan

  • Representative Tim Ryan (Democrat) announced on The View on April 4, 2019, that he was going to run for president of the United States.

UPDATE: Tim Ryan did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Tim Ryan did qualify for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: Tim Ryan did not qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). He failed to meet the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019, and failed to meet the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: Tim Ryan did not qualify for the fourth Democratic debate. Ballotpedia reported he did not meet the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls, donations from at least 130,000 unique donors, and a minimum of 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

UPDATE: Tim Ryan announced in a tweet on October 24, 2019, that he was withdrawing from the Presidential campaign. The tweet included a video.


Representative Eric Swalwell

  • Representative Eric Swalwell (Democrat) announced on April 8, 2019 that he was running for president. He made his announcement on The Late Show. Eric Swalwell wants to end gun violence.

UPDATE: Eric Swalwell did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE:Politico reported on July 8, 2019, that Eric Swalwell has ended “his long-shot bid for the presidency”. Eric Swalwell announced that he will instead seek a fifth term representing California’s 15th District.


Representative Seth Moulton

  • Representative Seth Moulton (Democrat) announced on April 22, 2019, that he is running for president. He tweeted: “I’m running for President to build a strong and safe country, create the jobs of the future, and elect leaders we can be proud of. Join our mission”. The tweet included a link to his website and a link to a YouTube video.

UPDATE: Seth Moulton did not qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Seth Moulton did not qualify for the second Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Seth Moulton did not qualify for the third Democratic debate.

UPDATE: On August 23, 2019, Seth Moulton tweeted: “Running for president with you behind me was one of the greatest honors of my life. Thank you for everything.” The tweet includes a screenshot of a letter that starts with: “I ran for president to fight for our values — for who we are — and to beat Donald Trump. But I always promised that if I didn’t see a path to the nomination, I would end my campaign and focus my efforts on helping Democrats win across the board next November. Today is that day.”


Former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden

  • Former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden (Democrat) announced on April 25, 2019, that he was running for President. He tweeted: “The core values of this nation… our standing in the world… our very democracy…everything that has made America — America — is at stake. That’s why today I’m announcing my candidacy for President of the United States. #Joe2020”. The tweet included a link to a YouTube video.

UPDATE: Joe Biden did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Joe Biden did qualify for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019)

UPDATE: Joe Biden did qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). He met the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019 and the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: Joe Biden did qualify for the fourth Democratic debate (October 15, 2019). He met the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls, donations from at least 130,000 unique donors, and a minimum of 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

UPDATE: Joe Biden did qualify for the fifth Democratic debate (November 20, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors.

UPDATE: Joe Biden did qualify for the sixth Democratic debate (December 19, 2019). To qualify for the debate, candidates had to reach 4% in four early-state or national polls or 6% in two early-state polls from Oct. 16 through Dec. 12, in addition to getting 200,000 unique donors, with 800 of those from 20 different states.

UPDATE: Joe Biden did qualify for the seventh Democratic debate (January 14, 2020). To qualify, candidates needed to hit at least 5% support in at least four DNC-approved national polls, or at least 7% in two DNC-approved polls from the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina. They also had to demonstrate that they had at least 225,000 unique donors and at least 1,000 donors in a minimum of 20 states.

UPDATE: Joe Biden did qualify for the eight Democratic debate (February 7, 2020). To qualify, candidates must have 5% support in four national or state polls out of New Hampshire, South Carolina, or Nevada, or 7% polling in two state polls from the list of qualified polls. Candidates must also demonstrate they have recieved contributions from 225,000 unique donors, including 1,000 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, U.S. territories, or the District of Columbia.

UPDATE: On January 21, 2020, the Democratic National Committee changed the criteria for the ninth Democratic debate (February 19, 2020). To qualify for the debate, candidates must recieve 10% of more in at least four polls between January 15, 2020, and February 18, 2020, which include national polls or Nevada and South Carolina polls, or hit at least 12% in two polls in Nevada and South Carolina. Candidates can also qualify for the debate if they get one delegate in either Iowa or New Hampshire. There will be no donor requirements. Joe Biden did qualify for the ninth Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Joe Biden did qualify for the tenth Democratic debate. (February 25, 2020).

On February 15, 2020, the Democratic National Committee changed the criteria for the tenth Democratic debate. To qualify, a candidate must either have been allocated at least one pledged delegate from either Iowa, New Hampshire, or Nevada.

OR the candidate must meet the polling threshold of 10% or more support in at least four polls, each of which must be sponsored by different Qualifying Poll Sponsors or by the same Qualifying Poll Sponsor in different geographic areas. They must also receive 12% or more support in two single-state polls in South Carolina that are sponsored by 13 specific Qualifying Poll Sponsors.


Senator Michael Bennet

  • Senator Michael Bennet (Democrat) announced in a tweet on May 2, 2019: “We cannot be the first generation to leave less to our kids, not more. That’s why I’m running for President. Let’s build opportunity for every American and restore integrity to our government.

UPDATE: Michael Bennet did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Michael Bennet did qualify for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: Michael Bennet did not qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). He failed to meet the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019, and failed to meet the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: Michael Bennet did not qualify for the fourth Democratic debate. Ballotpedia reported that he did not meet the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls, donations from at least 130,000 unique donors, and a minimum of 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

UPDATE: Michael Bennet did not qualify for the fifth Democratic debate (November 20, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors.

UPDATE: Michael Bennett did not qualify for the sixth Democratic debate (December 19, 2019). To qualify for the debate, candidates had to reach 4% in four early-state or national polls or 6% in two early-state polls from Oct. 16 through Dec. 12, in addition to getting 200,000 unique donors, with 800 of those from 20 different states.

UPDATE: Michael Bennett did not qualify for the seventh Democratic debate (January 14, 2020). To qualify, candidates needed to hit at least 5% support in at least four DNC-approved national polls, or at least 7% in two DNC-approved polls from the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina. They also had to demonstrate that they had at least 225,000 unique donors and at least 1,000 donors in a minimum of 20 states.

UPDATE: Michael Bennet ended his presidential campaign on February 11, 2020, the night of the New Hampshire primary.

ABC News reported that Michael Bennet ended his presidential campaign. From ABC News:

Sen. Michael Bennet is ending his bid for the White House.

“I though it was quiet possible today that we would fall short and I didn’t know that I would give that speech until about 15 minutes ago,” Bennet said Tuesday night…

…Separately, he said that despite ending his run, he was ready to support the Democratic nominee.

“I am going to do absolutely everything I can do as one human being to make sure Donald Trump is a one-term president,” he said. “I support the nominee of my party no matter who it is to make sure that we defeat Donald Trump”…

Dave Weigel, politics reporter for The Washington Post, tweeted from Michael Bennet’s rally after the New Hampshire voting had ended. The tweet said: “Michael Bennet drops out of the race: “I love you, New Hampshire. Whether you knew it or not, we were having a great time together… I think it’s fitting for us to end the campaign tonight.” The tweet includes a photo of Michael Bennet standing on a small stage, surrounded by supporters.

Michael Bennet tweeted (and pinned): “I love our country. I love the idea of democracy. And I want to pass it on to the next generation. I feel nothing buy joy tonight as we conclude this campaign and this chapter. Tonight wasn’t our night. But New Hampshire, you may see me again.”


Governor of Montana Steve Bullock

  • Governor of Montana Steve Bullock (Democrat) announced on May 14, 2019, that he was running for president. The announcment was made in a YouTube video.

UPDATE: Steve Bullock did not qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Steve Bullock did qualifiy for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: Steve Bullock did not qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). He failed to meet the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019, and failed to meet the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: Steve Bullock did not qualify for the fourth Democratic debate. Ballotpedia reported that he did not meet the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls, donations from at least 130,000 unique donors, and a minimum of 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

UPDATE: Steve Bullock did not qualify for the fifth Democratic debate (November 20, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors.

UPDATE: Steve Bullock tweeted on December 2, 2019, that he was suspending his campaign. The tweet said: “Today, I’m suspending my campaign for President. Thank you for your belief, your trust, and your support.” The tweet include a link to a Medium post in which he wrote: “Today, I announced that I’m suspending my campaign for President. While there were many obstacles we could not have anticipated when entering the race, it has become clear that in this moment, I won’t be able to break through to the top tier of this still-crowded field of candidates.”


Mayor of New York City Bill de Blasio

  • Mayor of New York City Bill de Blasio (Democrat) announced on May 16, 2019, that he was running for president. The announcement was made in a tweet: “Today I am proud to announce my candidacy for president of the United States of America, because it’s time to finally put working people first.” The tweet included a link to a YouTube video.

UPDATE: Bill de Blasio did qualify for the first Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Bill de Blasio did qualify for the second Democratic debate. (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: Bill de Blasio did not qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). He failed to meet the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019, and failed to meet the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: On September 20, 2019, Bill de Blasio wrote a piece on NBC News titled: “Why I’m ending my 2020 presidential campaign — and what I promise to do next”. He wrote: “After several months of campaigning, I have reached the point where I feel I have contributed all I can to this Democratic primary. Today, I’m ending my campaign for the presidency.”


Former Pennsylvania Congressman and retired three-star General Joe Sestak

  • Former Pennsylvania Congressman and retired three-star General Joe Sestak (Democrat) announced on June 23, 2019, that he was running for president. The announcement was made in a video on his official campaign website.

UPDATE: Joe Sestak did not qualify for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: Joe Sestak did not qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). He failed to meet the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019, and failed to meet the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: Joe Sestak did not qualify for the fourth Democratic debate. Ballotpedia reported that he did not meet the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls, donations from at least 130,000 unique donors, and a minimum of 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

UPDATE: Joe Sestak did not qualify for the fifth Democratic debate (November 20, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors.

UPDATE: Joe Sestak tweeted on December 1, 2019: “Thank you for this opportunity!”

The tweet included an image with a long statement that started with: “I want to thank you for the honor of running for President of the United States of America. It has been an endeavor filled with immeasurable wisdom, passions, humor and insights to, and from, the people of America. I have “lived America” …and I will cherish every moment, whether from a veteran from a maximum security penitentiary calling to say, “Hey, Joe, the guys have heard you’re running for President, and they want you to know they’re going to organize Philadelphia for you,” or the tears of a transgender youth as she quietly told me she just wants what everybody else wants. I could never pay enough for what I experienced, and the men and women I met.”

The statement also included this paragraph: “Again, thank you for this priceless opportunity as I end our campaign together. Without the privilege of national press, it is unfair to ask others to husband their resolve and sacrifice resources any longer. I deeply appreciate the support so many of you offered – whether by volunteering, offering financial contributions or coming to our campaign events. I will miss the opportunities I had in experiencing America in such a wonderful way!”


Former Hedge Fund Manager Tom Steyer

  • Former Hedge Fund Manager Tom Steyer (Democrat) announced on July 9, 2019, that he was running for president. The announcement was made in a tweet on his official Twitter account that included a video.

UPDATE: Tom Steyer did not qualify for the second Democratic debate (July 30 and 31, 2019).

UPDATE: Tom Steyer did not qualify for the third Democratic debate (September 12–13, 2019). He failed to meet the requirement to have at least 130,000 unique donors, with 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, with donations received by 11:59 p.m. August 28, 2019, and failed to meet the requirement to have received 2% or more support in at least four DNC approved polls released between June 28, 2019, and August 28, 2019.

UPDATE: Tom Steyer did qualify for the fourth Democratic debate (October 15, 2019). He met the qualifications of having at least 2% support in four national or early state polls, donations from at least 130,000 unique donors, and a minimum of 400 unique donors per state in at least 20 states.

UPDATE: Tom Steyer did qualify for the fifth Democratic debate (November 20, 2019). To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors.

UPDATE: Tom Steyer did qualify for the sixth Democratic debate (December 19, 2019). To qualify for the debate, candidates had to reach 4% in four early-state or national polls or 6% in two early-state polls from Oct. 16 through Dec. 12, in addition to getting 200,000 unique donors, with 800 of those from 20 different states.

UPDATE: Tom Steyer did qualify for the seventh Democratic debate (January 14, 2020). To qualify, candidates needed to hit at least 5% support in at least four DNC-approved national polls, or at least 7% in two DNC-approved polls from the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina. They also had to demonstrate that they had at least 225,000 unique donors and at least 1,000 donors in a minimum of 20 states.

UPDATE: Tom Steyer did qualify for the eighth Democratic debate (February 7, 2020). To qualify, candidates must have 5% support in four national or state polls out of New Hampshire, South Carolina, or Nevada, or 7% polling in two state polls from the list of qualified polls. Candidates must also demonstrate they have received contributions from 225,000 unique donors, including 1,000 unique donors per state in at least 20 states, U.S. territories, or the District of Columbia.

UPDATE: Tom Steyer did not qualify for the ninth Democratic debate. On January 21, 2020, the Democratic National Committee changed the criteria for the ninth Democratic Debate (February 19, 2020). To qualify for the debate, candidates must recieve 10% of more in at least four polls between January 15, 2020, and February 18, 2020, which include national polls or Nevada and South Carolina polls, or hit at least 12% in two polls in Nevada and South Carolina. Candidates can also qualify for the debate if they get one delegate in either Iowa or New Hampshire. There will be no donor requirements.

UPDATE: Tom Steyer did qualify for the tenth Democratic debate. (South Carolina, February 25, 2020).

On February 15, 2020, the Democratic National Committee changed the criteria for the tenth Democratic debate. To qualify, a candidate must either have been allocated at least one pledged delegate from either Iowa, New Hampshire, or Nevada.

OR the candidate must meet the polling threshold of 10% or more support in at least four polls, each of which must be sponsored by different Qualifying Poll Sponsors or by the same Qualifying Poll Sponsor in different geographic areas. They must also receive 12% or more support in two single-state polls in South Carolina that are sponsored by 13 specific Qualifying Poll Sponsors.


Former Illinois Congressman Joe Walsh

  • Former Illinois Congressman Joe Walsh (Republican) announced in a tweet on August 25, 2019: “Friends, I’m in. We can’t take four more years of Donald Trump. And that’s why I’m running for President. It won’t be easy, but bravery is never easy. But together, we can do it. Join me…” The tweet includes a link to his official website.

UPDATE: On February 7, 2020, Joe Walsh told CNN’s John Berman on “New Day” : “I am ending my candidacy for president of the United States.” He accused the Republican party of being a “cult”, and said Trump can’t be beat in the GOP primary “so there’s no reason for me, or any candidate, really to be in there.”

Joe Walsh came in third on the 2020 Republican Iowa Caucus on February 2, 2020.


Former Governor of South Carolina and former member of the U.S. House of Representatives Mark Sanford

  • Former Governor of South Carolina and former member of the U.S. House of Representatives Mark Sanford (Republican) announced in a thread of tweets on September 8, 2019, that he is running for President. The thread started with: “I am compelled to enter the Presidential Primary as a Republican for several reasons — the most important of which is to further and foster a national debate on our nation’s debt, deficits and spending.”

UPDATE: Mark Sanford announced that he was suspending his presidential campaign in a tweet that he posted on November 13, 2019. The tweet said: “I entered the presidential race to inspire a conversation about debt, deficits, and spending. Although I’ve suspended my campaign, I continue the important work towards our nation’s fiscal health and abundance. To the many who supported the message and mission, I thank you.”


Former Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick

  • Former Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick (Democrat) announced in a tweet on November 14, 2019, that he was running for president. The tweet said: “In a spirit of profound gratitude for all the country has given to me, with a determination to build a better, more sustainable, more inclusive American Dream for everyone: I am today announcing my candidacy for President of the United States”. The tweet included a video.

UPDATE: Deval Patrick did not qualify for the fifth Democratic debate. To qualify, candidates had to hit 3 percent in support in at least four early state or national polls that meet the DNC’s methodological requirements. They also must have at least 165,000 unique online donors.

UPDATE: Deval Patrick did not qualify for the sixth Democratic debate (December 19, 2019). To qualify for the debate, candidates had to reach 4% in four early-state or national polls or 6% in two early-state polls from Oct. 16 through Dec. 12, in addition to getting 200,000 unique donors, with 800 of those from 20 different states.

UPDATE: Deval Patrick did not qualify for the seventh Democratic debate (January 14, 2020). To qualify, candidates needed to hit at least 5% support in at least four DNC-approved national polls, or at least 7% in two DNC-approved polls from the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina. They also had to demonstrate that they had at least 225,000 unique donors and at least 1,000 donors in a minimum of 20 states.

UPDATE: Deval Patrick ended his presidential campaign on February 12, 2020, the day after the New Hampshire primary. He tweeted: “We can’t miss this moment – because failing to engage risks losing a whole lot more than an election in November. Today, we’re suspending our campaign, but not giving up the fight. Read my full statement:”

Deval Patrick’s full statement was posted as screenshots of text in that tweet. Here part of his statement:

Deval Patrick Statement on His Candidacy

I believe that America is yearning for two things: better outcomes and a better way. Better outcomes in our citizens lives and a better way of achieving them.

Having delivered health care to 99% of Massachusetts residents, nation leading student achievement and energy efficiency, responsible budgets, and the highest bond rating in Massachusetts history, I believed and still believe we had a strong case to make for being able to deliver better outcomes. And having shown through legislative initiatives, economic recovery, natural and man-made disasters, and a terrorist attack that we can lead by asking people to turn to each other instead of on each other. I thought we had a pretty good case for a better way as well.

But the vote in New Hampshire last night was not enough for us to create the practical wind at the campaign’s back to go on to the next round of voting. So I have decided to suspend the campaign, effective immediately.

I am not suspending my commitment to help – there is still work to be done. We are facing the most consequential election of our lifetime. Our democracy itself, let alone our civic commitments to equality, opportunity and fair play, are at risk…


Former Mayor of New York City Mike Bloomberg

Former Mayor of New York City Mike Bloomberg (Democrat) announced in a tweet on November 24, 2019 that he was running for president. The tweet said: “I’m running for president to defeat Donald Trump and rebuild America. I believe my unique set of experiences in business, government, and philanthropy will enable me to win and lead.” The tweet included a video and a link to his official 2020 website.

UPDATE: Mike Bloomberg did not qualify for the sixth Democratic debate (December 19, 2019). To qualify for the debate, candidates had to reach 4% in four early-state or national polls or 6% in two early-state polls from Oct. 16 through Dec. 12, in addition to getting 200,000 unique donors, with 800 of those from 20 different states. According to NPR, Bloomberg reached 5% in only two national polls, but even if the billionaire media mogul had hit the polling threshold, he wouldn’t have qualified on donors since he is entirely self-funding his campaign.

UPDATE: Mike Bloomberg did not qualify for the seventh Democratic debate (January 14, 2020). To qualify, candidates needed to hit at least 5% support in at least four DNC-approved national polls, or at least 7% in two DNC-approved polls from the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina. They also had to demonstrate that they had at least 225,000 unique donors and at least 1,000 donors in a minimum of 20 states. He met the qualification of having at least 5% in at least four DNC-approved national polls, or at least 7% in two DNC-approved polls from the early voting states – but did not met the criteria of having at least 225,000 unique donors.

UPDATE: On January 21, 2020, the Democratic National Committee changed the criteria for the ninth Democratic Debate (February 19, 2020). To qualify for the debate, candidates must recieve 10% of more in at least four polls between January 15, 2020, and February 18, 2020, which include national polls or Nevada and South Carolina polls, or hit at least 12% in two polls in Nevada and South Carolina. Candidates can also qualify for the debate if they get one delegate in either Iowa or New Hampshire. There will be no donor requirements. Mike Bloomberg did qualify for the ninth Democratic debate.

UPDATE: Mike Bloomberg did qualify for the tenth Democratic debate (February 25, 2020).

On February 15, 2020, the Democratic National Committee changed the criteria for the tenth Democratic debate. To qualify, a candidate must either have been allocated at least one pledged delegate from either Iowa, New Hampshire, or Nevada.

OR the candidate must meet the polling threshold of 10% or more support in at least four polls, each of which must be sponsored by different Qualifying Poll Sponsors or by the same Qualifying Poll Sponsor in different geographic areas. They must also receive 12% or more support in two single-state polls in South Carolina that are sponsored by 13 specific Qualifying Poll Sponsors.


People Running for President in 2020 is a post written by Jen Thorpe on Book of Jen and is not allowed to be copied to other sites.

If you enjoyed this blog post please consider supporting me on PayPal.me. Thank you!