Book Reviews, classics 1 comment on Civil Disobedience – by Henry David Thoreau

Civil Disobedience – by Henry David Thoreau

Civil Disobedience is an essay that is usually published inside a book that contains other writing by Henry David Thoreau.  The reason is because Civil Disobedience is extremely short.  There’s enough room to put it at the end of Walden.  My copy of Walden was a Barnes & Noble version that included not only Civil Disobedience,  but also a timeline of Thoreau’s life, an introduction, and a detailed section that described the meaning behind some of Thoreau’s references that were commonly understood at the time, but mysterious and confusing today.

Civil Disobedience was written in response to real life events that Henry David Thoreau experienced.  In 1846, he traveled through Massachusetts.  His purpose was to go to Concord, to run an errand.  (He needed to go to the cobblers to pick up his shoe that the cobbler repaired).  A man named Sam Staples was the tax collector and warden of the county jail.
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Book Reviews, classics 1 comment on Walden – by Henry David Thoreau

Walden – by Henry David Thoreau

Walden is a book that some people are first introduced to when they are forced to read it in school.  I didn’t read it until long after I’d finished school. The book came to me as a prize in a contest that was held during a meeting at work.  It took me years before I got around to actually reading the book.

To me, Walden was a difficult read.  I say this as a person who has dyslexia, and who also has a B.S. degree in Education. Take from that whatever you will.  I recommend that people pick up the Barnes & Noble version of Walden because it has a lot of “extras” in it that helped me to understand the background history of Thoreau and some of the references he mentioned.
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