Book Reviews, non fiction 0 comments on A Wolf at the Table – by Augusten Burroughs

A Wolf at the Table – by Augusten Burroughs

A Wolf at the Table: a Memoir of My Father might very well be the most terrifying non-fiction book I have ever read. Burroughs takes the reader on a journey through some of his earliest childhood memories, painting a picture of what his father was really like. In short, his father was, in my opinion, a monster.

The book starts out with a very young Augusten and his mother fleeing the house, and hiding out in hotels, because they weren’t “safe” at home with his father. Which means that some of the earliest memories he has of his father are equated with “not safe”.

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Book Reviews, fiction 0 comments on Sellevision – by Augusten Burroughs

Sellevision – by Augusten Burroughs

Sellevision is the one and only book written by Augusten Burroughs that is completely fictional.  Burroughs describes Sellevision as “my cheese popcorn book“. It’s yummy, and light, and probably not good for you at all, but it’s so much fun you just can’t put it down. Cheese popcorn is an appropriate description.

Sellevision is the name of a (fictional) home shopping channel, that has employed quite a few eccentric hosts to work for it. Take the movie “Soapdish”, mix it with the movie “Anchorman”, and add just a dash of the cattiness found in whatever tv show about teenagers in high school is the most popular at the moment, and you have Sellevision.

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Book Reviews, non fiction 0 comments on Possible Side Effects – by Augusten Burroughs

Possible Side Effects – by Augusten Burroughs

Possible Side Effects is another collection of short story memoirs by Augusten Burroughs. The material in this book is all new, and not found in any of his other books, which never fails to astonish me. How many crazy things can one person have happen in their life, after all? Apparently there is no limit.

The cover of this book is an attention getter. Bright yellow background, the same shade of yellow that stands for “danger” or, if found in nature, indicates that the contents might be poisonous if eaten. There is a large hand on the cover, which I didn’t see anything wrong with until I was nearly done reading the book.

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Book Reviews, non fiction 1 comment on Magical Thinking: True Stories – by Augusten Burroughs

Magical Thinking: True Stories – by Augusten Burroughs

The term “Magical Thinking” is defined by the Free Online Medical Dictionary as: irrational belief that one can bring about a circumstance or event by thinking about it or wishing for it.

You can find a better definition of Magical Thinking on one of the first pages of Burrough’s book. Burroughs uses the classic childhood example of “step on a crack and break your mother’s back”.

No rational person really believes that stepping on a crack in the sidewalk will cause their mother to have back problems. But, little kids still avoid the cracks, and sometimes, this behavior continues on into adulthood.

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Book Reviews, non fiction 0 comments on Dry – by Augusten Burroughs

Dry – by Augusten Burroughs

I don’t think it’s absolutely necessary that you read Burroughs’ first memoir before reading Dry, because Burroughs does a great job of filling in the blanks just enough to make the reader get what he’s referring to. I still highly recommend reading Running with Scissors first, anyway, to get the full story.

Dry takes place a few years after the end of Running With Scissors, and is primarily about Burrough’s stint in rehab, getting “dry”. He was working in advertising, and basically was given the choice of going to rehab because of his drinking, or losing his job. He “chose” rehab.

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Book Reviews, non fiction 2 comments on Running with Scissors – by Augusten Burroughs

Running with Scissors – by Augusten Burroughs

Your childhood, no matter how bad or crazy you think it was, will seem tame in comparison to what Augusten Burroughs experienced. Running with Scissors is one of those memoirs that makes all of us with “bad childhoods” feel a little more “normal”.

Burroughs writes so honestly, so intimately, censoring nothing, that it makes the reader feel like they’ve been sitting inside his head while these events were being lived.

Burroughs has his family fall apart at an early age. His dad is clearly an alcoholic, and his mom starts having mental health issues. She starts seeing this really eccentric psychologist (as a therapist, not as a lover) and suddenly, Augusten finds himself spending more and more time with the therapist’s dysfunctional family.

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